January is National Soup Month

In honor of national Soup Month I am featuring a

Guest Post from Ginnie Bivona, one of the best cooks in Texas.

Author’s note:

Ginnie has been my friend so long, the Dead Sea was only sick when we became friends. She had the job of editing my first cookbook Cajun Cooking, Making it Easy. The patience of a saint was needed to guide me through the publishing maze. Years later she is still advising me on everything that’s important in life, including how to make a delicious pot of soup. When I reached out to my foodie friends to contribute a guest post, she came through with one of my favorite recipes to celebrate National Soup Month.

The Invisible Chef Practices Medicine Brings You

TEXAS PENICILLIN

A sure cure for everything, including broken hearts

Everybody knows that home-made chicken soup is the best cure in the world for colds and various other miserable diseases. Jewish mothers knew it first, but like everything else in this modern day world, somebody leaked it to the press and the rest is history.

However, it took a Texan (Good old Invisible chef) to put the Southwest twist on it, and in doing so, turned plain soup into the best dang dish you’ll ever sink a happy tooth into. By the way, this recipe won Best of Show and First Prize at an Ohio State University Chili Cook-off. (Which gives you some idea of how much they know about chili in Ohio!) Never-the-less, try it, you’ll like it.

To print recipe click here

Texas Penicillin

2 lb. pkg. chicken tenders, or boneless, skinless chicken breasts(4 to 6)cut in cubes

4 cans low-salt chicken stock

3 large cloves fresh garlic, chopped (You can use less if you are a sissy)

1 can Italian or chili style diced tomatoes, 14 oz. size

1 medium zucchini, scrubbed, not peeled, cut in thin rounds

1 medium carrot, scrubbed, not peeled, sliced in thin rounds

or, easier: 1/2 bag shredded carrots

1 large red pepper, cut in thin strips

1 can sweet corn including liquid, 14 oz. size

1 large can ranch beans including liquid, 15 oz. size

4 tablespoons chili powder (to suit your taste)

2-1/2� tablespoons ground cumin (to taste)

4 green onions, sliced in thin rounds, green tops and all

1 cup (more or less) fresh cilantro, roughly chopped (that means cut in big pieces, not beat up) Cilantro is in the fresh produce section, near the parsley in fact, it looks sort of like parsley. Only it’s not.

Throw the chicken in a soup pot, pour chicken stock over, dump in the can of tomatoes (including liquid) and the garlic. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to simmer for 30 minutes or so, till chicken is very tender. Remove chicken and cut in cubes. Pitch chicken and all the fresh veggies -carrots, zucchini, and red pepper. Simmer another 7 to 10 minutes till they are just tender. Dump in canned beans and corn, and add all the spices simmer 10 more minutes, turn heat off and add the chopped green onion and fresh cilantro. It’ll take you less than an hour to put this all together and it makes a lot, but its so good you will eat on it all week! Or better yet, you can put it up in baggies and freeze it for reheating on a No-way-I’m-cooking-tonight night.

Serve with crusty hot bread for dippin’, and a nice mixed greens salad with honey mustard dressing.

Boy howdy! If this doesn’t cure whatever ails you, clean the parlor and call the preacher. . . you’re a goner.

The Invisible Chef is really a cookbook author, and also the author of a novel turned into a movie for Hallmark TV, starring Meredith Baxter, Lesley Ann Warren and Timothy Bottoms. See her web site at www.ginniebivona.com

This entry was posted in Soups and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to January is National Soup Month

  1. Pingback: January is National Soup Month | The Pittsburgh Tote Bag Project

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>